The Ancient Greek Hero, Course by Harvard

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Learning Experience9
Content Rating9.5

Discover the literature and ancient Greek hero or heroes through the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey, the tragedies of Sophocles, the dialogues of Plato more…

Last updated on December 3, 2021 1:27 am

Introduction

Discover the literature and ancient Greek hero or heroes through the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey, the tragedies of Sophocles, the dialogues of Plato, and more.

About this course on Ancient Greek Hero by Harvard

Explore what it means to be human today by studying what it meant to be a hero in ancient Greek times.

In this introduction to ancient Greek culture and literature, learners will experience, in English translation, some of the most beautiful works of ancient Greek literature and song-making spanning over a thousand years from the 8th century BCE through the 3rd century CE: the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey; tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; songs of Sappho and Pindar; dialogues of Plato, and On Heroes by Philostratus. All of the resources are free and designed to be equally accessible and transformative for a wide audience.

You will gain access to a supportive learning community led by Professor Gregory Nagy and his Board of Readers, who model techniques for “reading out” of ancient texts. This approach allows readers with little or even no experience in the subject matter to begin seeing this literature as an exquisite, perfected system of communication.

No previous knowledge of Greek history, literature, or language is required. This is a project for students of any age, culture, and geographic location, and its profoundly humanistic message can be easily received without previous acquaintance with Western Classical literature.

What you will learn from this course on Ancient Greek Hero?

  • To read “out of,” rather than “into,” a literary text, which is the art of close reading
  • The definition of a “hero” in the Classical Greek sense, contrasted with modern concepts of heroism
  • The relationship between epic and lyric in the ancient Greek tradition
  • To explore the interaction of text and image in the ancient Greek tradition
  • About hero cult and the role of heroes as objects of worship in ancient Greece
  • About the connection between myth and ritual in ancient Greece
  • The concept of the hero as conveyed in dramatic performance and as activated through Socratic dialogue

Syllabus on Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours:

  • Hours 0. Introduction

    • Understanding Homeric Poetry
    • The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours (H24H)
  • Hour 1. Introduction: The Glory of the Unseasonal Hero

  • Hour 2. Introduction: Achilles as an epic hero and the idea of total recall in song

  • Hour 3. Introduction: Achilles and the Poetics of Lament

  • Hour 4. Introduction: Achilles as a lyric hero in the songs of Sappho and Pindar

  • Hour 5. Introduction: When mortals become ‘equal’ to immortals

  • Hour 6. Patroklos as the other self of Achilles

  • Hour 7. Ancient Greek Hero: The sign of the hero in the visual and verbal art

  • Hour 8. Ancient Greek Hero: The psychology of the hero’s sign in the Homeric Iliad

  • Hour 9. Introduction: The return of Odysseus in the Homeric Odyssey

  • Hour 10. Introduction: The mind of Odysseus in the Homeric Odyssey

  • Hour 11. Introduction: Blessed are the heroes

  • Hour 12. Introduction: The cult hero as an exponent of justice in Homeric poetry and beyond

  • Hour 13. A crisis in reading the world of heroes

  • Hour 14. Ancient Greek Hero: Longing for a hero

  • Hour 15. Ancient Greek Hero: What the hero ‘means’

  • Hour 16. Heroic aberration in the Agamemnon of Aeschylus

  • Hour 17. Looking beyond the cult hero

  • Hour 18. Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus and the power of the cult hero in death

  • Hour 19. Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus and heroic pollution

  • Hour 20. Introduction: contexts of Hippolytus

  • Hour 21. The hero’s agony in the Bacchae of Euripides

  • Hour22. The living word I: Socrates in Plato’s Apology of Socrates

  • Hour 23. The living word II: Socrates in Plato’s Phaedo

  • Hour 24: Ancient Greek Hero: The Hero as Savior

  • Afterword: Achieving Telos

    • Fundamental truth and the Ancient Greek Hero
    • Epilogue: Don’t forget to sacrifice a rooster to Asklepios

Note: Your review matters 

If you have already done this course, kindly drop your review in our reviews section. It would help others to get useful information and better insight into the course offered.

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  • EDX
  • Harvard University
  • Online Course
  • Self-paced
  • Beginner
  • 3+ Months
  • Free Course (Affordable Certificate)
  • English
  • Greek History History
Learning Experience
9
Content Rating
9.5
PROS: You will gain access to a supportive learning community led by Professor Gregory Nagy. No previous knowledge of Greek history, literature, or language is required. Project can start for any students of any age, culture, and geographic location.
CONS: Need to focus on the elaboration of the course content. Course material is too challenging.

Description

Introduction

Discover the literature and ancient Greek hero or heroes through the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey, the tragedies of Sophocles, the dialogues of Plato, and more.

About this course on Ancient Greek Hero by Harvard

Explore what it means to be human today by studying what it meant to be a hero in ancient Greek times.

In this introduction to ancient Greek culture and literature, learners will experience, in English translation, some of the most beautiful works of ancient Greek literature and song-making spanning over a thousand years from the 8th century BCE through the 3rd century CE: the Homeric Iliad and Odyssey; tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; songs of Sappho and Pindar; dialogues of Plato, and On Heroes by Philostratus. All of the resources are free and designed to be equally accessible and transformative for a wide audience.

You will gain access to a supportive learning community led by Professor Gregory Nagy and his Board of Readers, who model techniques for “reading out” of ancient texts. This approach allows readers with little or even no experience in the subject matter to begin seeing this literature as an exquisite, perfected system of communication.

No previous knowledge of Greek history, literature, or language is required. This is a project for students of any age, culture, and geographic location, and its profoundly humanistic message can be easily received without previous acquaintance with Western Classical literature.

What you will learn from this course on Ancient Greek Hero?

  • To read “out of,” rather than “into,” a literary text, which is the art of close reading
  • The definition of a “hero” in the Classical Greek sense, contrasted with modern concepts of heroism
  • The relationship between epic and lyric in the ancient Greek tradition
  • To explore the interaction of text and image in the ancient Greek tradition
  • About hero cult and the role of heroes as objects of worship in ancient Greece
  • About the connection between myth and ritual in ancient Greece
  • The concept of the hero as conveyed in dramatic performance and as activated through Socratic dialogue

Syllabus on Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours:

  • Hours 0. Introduction

    • Understanding Homeric Poetry
    • The Ancient Greek Hero in 24 Hours (H24H)
  • Hour 1. Introduction: The Glory of the Unseasonal Hero

  • Hour 2. Introduction: Achilles as an epic hero and the idea of total recall in song

  • Hour 3. Introduction: Achilles and the Poetics of Lament

  • Hour 4. Introduction: Achilles as a lyric hero in the songs of Sappho and Pindar

  • Hour 5. Introduction: When mortals become ‘equal’ to immortals

  • Hour 6. Patroklos as the other self of Achilles

  • Hour 7. Ancient Greek Hero: The sign of the hero in the visual and verbal art

  • Hour 8. Ancient Greek Hero: The psychology of the hero’s sign in the Homeric Iliad

  • Hour 9. Introduction: The return of Odysseus in the Homeric Odyssey

  • Hour 10. Introduction: The mind of Odysseus in the Homeric Odyssey

  • Hour 11. Introduction: Blessed are the heroes

  • Hour 12. Introduction: The cult hero as an exponent of justice in Homeric poetry and beyond

  • Hour 13. A crisis in reading the world of heroes

  • Hour 14. Ancient Greek Hero: Longing for a hero

  • Hour 15. Ancient Greek Hero: What the hero ‘means’

  • Hour 16. Heroic aberration in the Agamemnon of Aeschylus

  • Hour 17. Looking beyond the cult hero

  • Hour 18. Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus and the power of the cult hero in death

  • Hour 19. Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus and heroic pollution

  • Hour 20. Introduction: contexts of Hippolytus

  • Hour 21. The hero’s agony in the Bacchae of Euripides

  • Hour22. The living word I: Socrates in Plato’s Apology of Socrates

  • Hour 23. The living word II: Socrates in Plato’s Phaedo

  • Hour 24: Ancient Greek Hero: The Hero as Savior

  • Afterword: Achieving Telos

    • Fundamental truth and the Ancient Greek Hero
    • Epilogue: Don’t forget to sacrifice a rooster to Asklepios

Note: Your review matters 

If you have already done this course, kindly drop your review in our reviews section. It would help others to get useful information and better insight into the course offered.

FAQ

Specification:

  • EDX
  • Harvard University
  • Online Course
  • Self-paced
  • Beginner
  • 3+ Months
  • Free Course (Affordable Certificate)
  • English
  • Greek History History

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The Ancient Greek Hero, Course by Harvard
The Ancient Greek Hero, Course by Harvard

$169.00

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